BtC: Breed-Specific Rescue

It’s that time again!

I’m even going to do you guys a favour by switching it up and not blogging about Actions Speak Louder (Calgary).  But don’t get too excited; I’m not straying too far from that sentiment.

When advocating for the end of retail pet sales, a surprisingly common question that gets asked is “well, then where will people get pets?”  The answer is simple: rescue or reputable breeders.

But the problem with that answer is that it seems to divide animals – or dogs specifically – into two separate categories: mixed breed mutts (rescue) or purebred companions (breeders).

What I think often gets forgotten is that you can rescue a purebred dog.

Purebred dogs, or purebred-type dogs (in other words, non-registerable), often wind up in your large, local, well-known rescue organizations that such as your local pound, SPCA, Humane Society, or other similar organization.

They also are often taken in by your lesser-known or smaller rescue operations.  Take, for example, Pound Rescue, out of Okotoks, Alberta: their Facebook page recently released a photo of Sophie, a purebred Bloodhound now in their care and up for adoption.

Sophie - Pound Rescue

And if the idea of routinely sorting through your local rescues in the hopes a dog the breed you’re looking for happens to come up for adoption, there’s always Pet Finder.com, which does the work for you.  Just plunk in your location and the breed you’re looking for and voila!  Dozens, if not hundreds, of results – all dogs available for adoption through rescue agencies.

But another approach, and what seems (to me) to get less visibility than any of the above options, is to look for a local breed-specific rescue.

Take Calgary and area, for example.  I lived here for a long time as a member of “Joe Public” before I became involved in the pet community and I had no idea the multitude of local rescue agencies that exist outside of the Humane Society (both breed-specific and not).

Looking for a little dog, but flexible on breed?  Then check out Little Mutts Rescue – they have lots!

Interested in a beagle?  Beagle Paws can help you out.

Maybe you’d like a bulldog?  Alberta Bulldog Rescue are the folks to contact.

In the market for something bigger? Say, Great Dane?  For the Love of Danes Rescue Society will be happy to help.

Bubba is a successful adoption tale from For the Love of Danes Rescue Society

Looking for a loveable pitbull?  Pitbulls for Life are run out of Spruce Grove, Alberta.

Keera is currently up for adoption through Pitbulls For Life

My point?

For nearly every breed, there is a breed-specific rescue somewhere. Canadogs.com has an extensive list here of breed-specific rescues around the country.

Gitta is up for adoption through Southern Alberta Rottweiler Rescue. http://www.albertarottweilers.com/index.html

And coming back to that familiar tune: I beg you to tell me how these options are not better than a pet store purchase.  Seriously.

Not sure where your rescue dog comes from or who the parents were?  You don’t know that with a pet store purchase either.

Nor can you guarantee that the pet store will have the exact cockeryorkapoowhatchamacallit you want any more than a rescue can meet your exact parameters.

Not to mention rescuing a dog from a nonprofit (where adoption fees just cover care, admin, vet bills, and spay/neuter) is significantly different than emptying that spot in the store window just so another commercially bred puppy can fill it.

Shadrach is up for adoption through the Bernese Mountain Dog Club of Canada. http://www.bmdcc.ca/dogs_for_adoption.htm

To sum up: the change I’m blogging and would like to see is more visibility and preference for breed-specific rescue organizations.

Thanks for the readership and see you all in October for the next Blog the Change for Animals!

To read how others are blogging the change, find the official July Blog Hop here.

Rocket here is currently looking for a home through Calgary Basset Rescue. http://www.bassetrescuecalgary.com/

A note for full disclosure: aside from a fleeting reference or two, reputable breeders have been left out of this post because that it not what it’s about. The intent here is to draw attention to a lesser-known adoption option.  Period.  My own dog is purebred and did come from a reputable breeder; and I would do it again. I am not one of those to call an end to all dog breeding or the CKC.